Hover over images in the slideshow above to learn about each nation's language program successes.

Below are examples of some of the incorporated utilities.

Preserving our Mother Tongues Online

©2015 K. Whitney

 

Overview    -    Importance     -     Obstacles     -     Success Stories     -     Recommendations    -    Research Resources

Byki.com
 
Ojibwe is presented in an interactive flashcard app, where it expandable and portable.
YouTube.com
 
Many language programs offer audio-visual lessons via video self-publishing, such as YouTube.
SoundCloud.com
 
Some audio sites allow for self-publishing, making language learning all the more freely accessible.
Adobe Connect
 
The Cherokee language is taught with an instructor and participants in an interactive learning space. Sessions have been archived in video form.
Tlingit

Tlingit

The Sealaska Heritage Foundation seeks to provide downloadable resources in a variety of media in order to reach learners everywhere who may not have access to fluent speakers (Carroll). An observation of the site reveals that all levels of learning are addressed, and with many different teaching styles.

Ojibwe (Ojibwe.net)

Ojibwe (Ojibwe.net)

Spoken lessons and language examples are aimed at auditory and visual learners. The program is linked to social media components to encourage feedback and connect language learners to each other ("How Social Media Helps").

Ojibwe (Ojibwe People's Dictionary)

Ojibwe (Ojibwe People's Dictionary)

The University of Minnesota project expanded a 7,000-word dictionary to a 30,000-word program (and growing), with words provided in cultural and pictorial context ("U of MN").

Menominee

Menominee

Menominee Tribal College had 400 active students in their 2012 online language program. With grants from the Administration for Native Americans, they have created language instruction videos, trained tribal college teachers, and upgraded to the use of mobile devices, allowing large, portable language libraries to be accessed anywhere. YouTube and Facebook groups supplement learning and student connections (Benton).

Cherokee

Cherokee

Haas points to the Cherokee Nation website as an example of: "survivance," a strategy of survival and resistance that preserves, among other things, language; as an example of rhetorical sovereignty, in part to preserve the native language; and recognizing real-life literacies by providing dual language options.

Adobe Flash
 
Tlingit is presented in a number of interactive formats targeting different ages and levels of comprehension. 
Facebook.com
 
Some language programs correlate to social media accounts so that language learners and speakers can connect and create an immersive experience.